My Visual Journal

Baby Robot

Coral Gables, Florida. November 2, 2010. Graduate Assistant, Whitney Mattson, holds the custom made baby motion detector used to research the movements of infants reaching for items and their interactions. The technology for the light-up motion suit is the same used for video games and animation, but it has never been used for babies. The staff modified it from its adult form. The research is being used to create a baby robot that develops cognitive skills from a grant from the NSF (National Science Foundation). Daniel Messinger, associate professor in Department of Psychology, is leading a team of University of Miami graduate student examined 13 mothers and babies between 1 and 6 months of age as they interact. Photo by Lindsay Brown.

Coral Gables, Florida. October 2, 2010. This is a screenshot of a mother interacting with her baby and a graph of the baby's movements. This is an example of the research Daniel Messinger, associate professor in Department of Psychology, is doing with his team of University of Miami graduate students. The team is studying the motions of babies to eventually be used to create a baby robot. Courtesy of Daniel Messinger.

Coral Gables, Florida. November 2, 2010. Graduate Assistant, Whitney Mattson, discusses research with Daniel Messinger, associate professor in Department of Psychology. They are researching the cognitive development of infants to create a baby robot that develops cognitive skills. The researchers found that in the first six months of life, babies develop turn-taking skills. The research is being done with a grant from the NSF (National Science Foundation) to create a robot named is Diego-San. The construction of the robot was a joint venture between Kokoro Dreams and the Machine Perception Laboratory at UC San Diego. Photo by Lindsay Brown.

 

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